Joloyemi

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Joloyemi

  • Joloyemí (Ido)
Joloyemi Special Administrative Area
Joloyemi view.jpg
Flag of Joloyemi
Flag
Country Ayorin
Foundation1461
Statute of Autonomy7 September 1975
Transfer of sovereignty1 January 1976
Most populous districtBinri
DistrictsBinri, Enu, Laaarin, Ilorin
Government
 • TypeDevolved government in a constitutional monarchy
 • BodyCouncil of Joloyemi
 • PresidentEnitan Kayode
 • LegislatureLegislative Assembly
Area
 • Total169.41 km2 (65.41 sq mi)
Area rank??th in Ayorin
Population
 (2016)
 • Total2,052,343
 • Rank2nd in Ayorin
 • Density12,000/km2 (31,000/sq mi)
Demonym(s)Joloyemi people
GDP
 (nominal; 2016)
 • Total₭00.000 billion
 • Per capita₭00,000
GDP
 (PPP; 2016)
 • Total₭00.000 billion
 • Per capita₭00,000
Time zoneUTC-1 (AST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-1 (AST)
Area code+47
ISO 3166 codeAY-JL
Official languagesImo, Breislandic (also recognised)

Joloyemi, officially the Joloyemi Special Administrative Area ([Joloyemí Agbegbe Pataki] error: {{lang-xx}}: text has italic markup (help); Breislandic: Sonderverwaltungszone Joloyemi), is a city and special administrative territory of the Federation of Ayorin. The city is located on the northern shore of the estuary of the Jakajado River, where it empties into Makai Bay. The city's autonomous status was retained in the 1975 Joloyemi referendums and guranteed in perpetuity by the Ayori government in subsequent negotiations with Breisland. It is the largest special economic zone in Ayorin and since returning to its control, has enjoyed preferential policies such as reduced corporate and income taxes.

Originally a fishing village and market town, Joloyemi rapidly grew in importance to Illypnian powers in the 19th century due to trade and its strategic location at the mouth of the Jakajado River. Following the Partition of Owuro in 1790 at the hands of Breisland and per the stipulations of the Treaty of Wari, Joloyemi was delegated as a free and open port, with it's neutrality jointly guaranteed by Breisland and Burawa. The city subsequently flourished, becoming a major commercial and financial hub of the ??? region. Upon the Burawa Revolution, Burawi enforcers withdrew from the city and the newly independent Republic of Ayorin, and Breisland assumed complete control of the city. The outbreak of the Ayori Civil War delayed Joloyemi's handover to the State of Ayorin for two decades, and the city officially returned to Ayorin sovereignty on 1 January 1976.

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